Can of Soda is it Healthy?

82 / 100

Can of Soda

A can of soda is it healthy, a 12 ounce can contains a whopping 14 grams of sugar – more than the recommended daily intake for women of 25 grams of sugar and 3 grams more than the recommended daily intake of 36 grams for men. Eliminating soda from your diet does not only reduce weight gain risk, but also helps weight loss, says Dr Rodriguez-Lopez.    Show Sources    “That one can holds a whopping 14 grams more than the American Heart Associations (AHA) recommended daily intake of 25 grams of sugar for a woman, and 3 grams more than the recommended daily intake of 36 grams for a man.” 6
    “Cutting soda out of your diet not only lowers your risk for weight gain, but may help you actually lose weight as well, says Dr. Rodriguez-Lopez.” 6

Drinking diet soda may help you reduce sugar intake but may not provide any direct health benefits. Research suggests that using artificial sweeteners instead of real sugar can lead to weight gain through compensatory behavior over time – in other words, people who drink diet soda eat more sugar in the form of processed foods because they believe that dietary soda saves calories. Research also shows that artificial sweeteners have no lasting effect on weight loss and that consuming sweeteners in the absence of real sugar can contribute to cravings for sweet foods and drinks.    Show Sources    “Drinking diet soda can certainly help you curb your sugar consumption, but it does not provide any direct health benefits.” 2
    “Research has shown us that artificial sweeteners do not have a lasting effect on weight loss, probably because consuming artificial sweeteners still contributes to cravings for sweet-tasting foods and drinks, even in the absence of actual sugar.” 2
    “Some research even suggests that using artificial sweeteners in place of real sugar could lead to weight gain over time due to compensatory behaviors–in other words, people who drink diet soda regularly might eat more sugar in the form of processed food because they think they are “saving” calories with the diet soda.” 2

In one study, people who drank sugary soda consumed more calories than their current diet 17% of the time (6). A study by the American Diabetes Association shows that consuming one or more sodas a day increases the risk of metabolic syndrome (3.6%) and type 2 diabetes (6.7%) compared to none. One study linked consumption of lemonade to larger waist circumferences in later life.    Show Sources    “One study even linked diet soda consumption to a larger waist circumference later in life.” 2
    “In one study, people who drank sugary soda in addition to their current diet consumed 17% more calories than before ( 6 ).” 14
    “An American Diabetes Association study reported that consuming one or more sodas per day compared to none at all increased the risk of metabolic syndrome by 36% and type 2 diabetes by 67%.” 0

A similar elevated risk of diabetes associated with increased consumption of soft drinks and fruit drinks was observed in the Black Womens Health Study, an ongoing long-term study of 60,000 African-American women in parts of the United States. The Nurses Health Study is another study that has linked soda consumption to type 2 diabetes. Study participants reported drinking one or more servings of sugar-sweetened soft drinks and developing diabetes when they drank lemonade.    Show Sources    “A similar increase in risk of diabetes with increasing soft drink and fruit drink consumption was seen recently in the Black Womens Health Study, an ongoing long-term study of nearly 60,000 African-American women from all parts of the United States.” 8
    “The Nurses Health Study researched the link between soda consumption and type 2 diabetes.” 7
    “Participants in the study that reported drinking one or more servings of sugar-sweetened soft drinks developed diabetes twice as often during the study than those who rarely drink soda.” 7

One study followed 180,000 women who completed a questionnaire about food frequency at the beginning of the study and four years later as part of a follow-up. The study shows that women who drank a or more servings of sugary lemonade a day had a 63 percent increase in development of seropositive rheumatoid arthritis compared to women who drank lemonade rarely.    Show Sources    “One study followed over 180,000 women who completed a food-frequency questionnaire at the start of the study and every four years as part of the follow-up.” 7
    “The study indicated that women who drank one or more servings of sugary soda daily had a 63 percent increase in developing seropositive rheumatoid arthritis when compared to women who rarely drank soda.” 7

One of the most obvious side effects of consuming soda is the weight gain risk due to the influx of calories and sugar. A 12-ounce soda contains 150 calories and 40 grams of sugar. That’s more calories than a soft drink that puts on the pounds, and lemonade has been shown to lead to weight gain.    Show Sources

A study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition has found that drinks high in fructose corn syrup, which strongly resembles soda, are linked to obesity. The latest study found that those who drink over a long period of time sugar-sweetened or artificially sweetened drinks have an increased risk of death.    Show Sources

Many sodas contain fructose (corn syrup) that does not lower the hunger hormone ghrelin like glucose (sugar) in starchy foods. Drinking a can of soda can cause blood sugar to soar because it causes the pancreas to produce insulin that metabolizes sugar. Studies have shown that the more 150 calories of sugar you consume on the first day of soda, the higher your risk of type 2 diabetes increases by 11 percent.    Show Sources    “That is because many sodas contain high-fructose corn syrup, which does not lower ghrelin, the hunger hormone, the same way glucose (the sugar found in starchy foods) does.” 5
    “This study found that the risk for type 2 diabetes increases by 1.1 percent for every additional 150 calories of sugar consumed per day, and that is just one can of soda.” 5
    “Drinking soda causes your blood sugar to spike, and it sends your pancreas into overdrive producing insulin to metabolize all that sugar.” 16

A study by the American Heart Association and the journal Circulation concluded that consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages such asa can of soda is associated with the onset of type 2 diabetes. The researchers behind the study recommended a reduction in the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, and we couldn’t agree more. The Heart Association recommends eating no more than 450 calories from sugar-sweetened drinks a week, which equates to about three cans of cola.    Show Sources

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) 49% of U.S. adults consume at least one sugary drink (lemonade or soda) a day. In fact, when you stop drinking lemonade your body changes for the better with notable health benefits, reveals Dr. Rodriguez-Lopez. Sugar and calories are like smoke and fire: there is much of one and much of the other.    Show Sources    “According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), 49% of adults in the U.S. consume one sugary drink, like soda or lemonade, every day.” 6
    “The fact is, your body changes for the better when you stop drinking a can of soda — Dr. Rodriguez-Lopez reveals the remarkable health benefits.” 6
    “Sugar and calories are like smoke and fire — if there is a lot of one, there is probably a lot of the other.” 6

If you choose not to drink a 12-ounce can of lemonade, you’ll save yourself 140 calories and 32 grams of sugar. There are many other refreshing drinks that have more nutritional value than you can drink lemonade.    Show Sources    “So when you decide not to drink that 12-ounce can of soda, you have saved yourself about 140 calories and 32 grams of sugar.” 6
    “There are plenty of other refreshing beverages, with nutritional value, that you can drink instead of can of soda.” 10

Many lemonade lovers understand the negative effects of lemonade and think that switching to diet sodas is a better option because they boast zero calories. But some health experts are holding back on diet sodas as more evidence emerges linking them to harmful health conditions. Ochner says he’s open to a skeptical view of diet soda because no study has shown a causal link between diet soda and obesity.    Show Sources    “Many soda lovers who understand the ill effects of a can of soda think that turning to diet soft drinks may be a better option, since these beverages tout “zero” calories.” 12
    “But health experts are still on the fence about diet soda, as more and more evidence surfaces linking these drinks to equally damaging health conditions.” 12
    “Ochner said he has an open, but skeptical view about diet soda, since the studies out there have yet to establish a causal connection between diet soft drinks and obesity.” 12

Studies suggest that the artificial sweeteners used in diet soda use many of the same negative effects on metabolism and appetite. Acid in soda can irritate the stomach lining and cause heartburn and acid reflux. Numerous additives are in sodium benzoate, phosphoric acid, artificial dyes and Bisphenol A. Consumption of these additives can cause serious health problems such as DNA damage, hyperactivity, low bone density, tooth decay, kidney disease, cancer and much more.    Show Sources    “Acid from soda can irritate the stomach lining, and cause heartburn and acid reflux.” 15
    “Studies suggest that even the artificial sweeteners used in diet soda have many of the same negative effects on metabolism and appetite.” 15
    “There are numerous additives in a can of soda, including sodium benzoate, phosphoric acid, artificial color, and Bisphenol A. Consuming any of these artificial ingredients can cause some serious health risks such as DNA damage, hyperactivity, low bone density, tooth decay, kidney disease, cancer, and more.” 9

Whether it’s due to caffeine intake or not, a can of soda is one of the most popular sugary beverages on the market. It has no nutritional value and is bad for health. In addition to calories, chemicals found in many beverage cans, such as BPA, can also have a negative impact on waistlines.    Show Sources    “In addition to calories, the chemicals found in many soda cans, such as BPA, can also have an adverse effect on your waistline.” 9
    “Whether it is due to the fizz or the caffeine boost, a can of soda is one of the most popular sugary drinks on the market.” 7
    “Soda does not provide any nutritional value and is generally bad for your health.” 7

Sugary beverages that are also classified as sugar-sweetened beverages or soft drinks refer to beverages that add sugar or other sweeteners such as high-fructose corn syrup (sucrose), fruit juices, concentrates and more. These include lemonades, pop, cola, tonics, fruit punch, lemonades and other ADE-sweetened powder drinks, sports and energy drinks. As a category, sugary drinks are the largest source of calories and sugars in the US diet.    Show Sources    “Sugary drinks (also categorized as sugar-sweetened beverages or “soft” drinks) refer to any beverage with added sugar or other sweeteners (high fructose corn syrup, sucrose, fruit juice concentrates, and more).” 8
    “This includes soda, pop, cola, tonic, fruit punch, lemonade (and other “ades”), sweetened powdered drinks, as well as sports and energy drinks.” 8
    “As a category, these beverages are the single largest source of calories and added sugar in the U.S. diet.” 8

Cited Sources

can of soda

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

WhatsApp chat